Graupner G-Booster 160

Prices correct 2010

Best Price £2,750 from Al's Hobbies as used by 1st place Stephan Volker (Skygate BAe Hawk) and 2nd place Thomas Hoechsmann (Skygate BAe Hawk) in the individual class of the 7th World Jet Masters 2007.

GRAUPNER G Booster 160 jet engine complete with starter device, Orbit control unit, EDT display and programming unit, precision fuel pump, two magnetic fuel valves, fuel tubing, quick-release connector set, battery, refuelling fittings, fuel tank clunk pick-up and cable set, turbine mounting clamp, operating instructions.

Graupner G Booster series User Manual

Specification

Thrust approx. 160 N
Diameter 110 mm
Length 290 mm
Weight 1410 g
Rotor speed 30,000 - 125,000 rpm
Turbine wheel Ø 71.0 mm
Mass throughput
Efflux velocity ~ 1650 km / h
Fuel consumption ~ 410 ml / min
Fuel: Jet A1, kerosene, approved petroleum
plus 5% turbine oil, e.g. AERO SHELL 500
Maintenance interval : 50 hours or 10,000 km

 

GRAUPNER G Booster130 £2,300

Specification

Thrust: 100 N - 140 N adjustable *
Weight: 1540 g (54 oz.)
Diameter: 112 mm (4.4")
Length incl. starter: 288 mm (11.3")
Rotor speed: 30,000 - 119,000 rpm
Fuel consumption: 450 ml / min (13 fl.oz/min.)
Fuel type: Jet A1, kerosene, petroleum plus 5% turbineoil
Maintenance interval: 50 hours or 500 million revolutions
Jet speed: max. 1650 km/h (1025 mph)

 

GRAUPNER G Booster 80 £2,250

Price from Al's Hobbies

Specification
Thrust: 50 N - 85 N adjustable *
Weight: 970 g (34 oz.)
Diameter: 91 mm (3.6")
Length incl. starter: 230 mm (9")
Rotor speed: 45,000 - 165,000 rpm
Fuel consumption: 290 ml / min (8 fl.oz/min.)
Fuel type: Jet A1, kerosene, petroleum plus 5% turbine oil
Maintenance interval: 50 hours or 500 million revolutions
Jet speed: max. 1650 km/h (1025 mph)

 

The GRAUPNER G-BOOSTER series of model turbines works in a similar fashion to full-size jet aircraft power plants. Air is sucked into the engine and compressed by a single-stage radial compressor. The air is then mixed with fuel in the combustion chamber and heated by a fuel flame. As the mixture burns, the air mass expands massively and is forced out of the engine, passing through an axial turbine wheel, which in turn drives the compressor via a shaft (cycle effect).

The exhaust gas accelerates to a very high speed (approx. 1000 km / hr) as it leaves the tail end of the turbine, and this produces the thrust required to propel the model jet.

The turbines feature an electric starter motor and electric kerosene ignition device, making it possible to control the engine completely automatically from the radio control system transmitter. These processes are controlled and monitored by the JETRONIC Vx control unit, which constantly sets all the operating parameters to the optimum values. Auxiliary starting gas, such as propane and butane, is no longer required by this new generation of engines.

All the auxiliary electrical components, i.e. fuel pump, kerosene igniters, starter, valves etc., are powered by a single separate battery.

The GRAUPNER G-BOOSTER series of jet engines features approximately the same external dimensions and weight as its predecessors, but offers much higher thrust (60 N to 170 N). The latest precision CNC and laser technology is employed to obtain an unprecedented level of manufacturing precision, guaranteeing that the turbines provide high performance and a long effective life.

Each set also includes a display and programming unit (Engine Data Terminal) featuring an illuminated alpha-numeric LCD; it can be plugged in and disconnected when the engine is running, so that you can read off the current operational data and adjust the settings if necessary.

In addition to the momentary operational data such as exhaust gas temperature (EGT), rotational speed (rpm) and thrust (Throttle), the unit is also able to display statistical data including total turbine running time, rotational speed and temperature statistics, number of starts, battery voltage etc.

A menu control system based on a plain text dialogue is used for all displays and input procedures. The turbine is started fully automatically using the transmitter throttle stick; the pilot then pre-sets the level of thrust he requires using the throttle stick; full proportional control is available. The JETRONIC control unit is connected to the receiving system using R/C 1; R/C 2 is optional, and operates as a switched function
Important:
handling a jet-engine model requires the greatest care and considerable technical expertise. Please read the Safety Notes included in the Operating Instructions.


Pack contents
Jet engine complete with starter device, JETRONIC control unit, EDT display and programming unit, precision fuel pump, two magnetic fuel valves, fuel tubing, quick-release connector set, battery, refuelling fittings, fuel tank clunk pick-up and filler fitting, cable set, turbine mounting clamp, operating instructions.

*The thrust range is electronically adjustable by setting the idle- and the full thrust revolution speed. All performance data are related to International Standard Atmosphere, ISA and optimal operating conditions which means, fuel, thrust tube and sufficient air supply

 

SimJets prices from Simjet 2008

SimJet 1200-18 AES GE £1,720

Thrust at full power 18 Lbs / 80N

Weight Including Starter 850g

Diameter 3.5 inches / 90mm

RPM Range 40,000 -161,000

Exhaust temp 650 C

Fuel Consumption 8.1 oz min at full power, Fuel Jet A1

 

SimJet 2300-S-25 AES GE £1,900

Thrust at full power 25 Lbs / ??N

Weight Including Starter 1,400g

Diameter 4.5 inches / 113mm

RPM Range 28,000 - 120,000

Exhaust temp 590 C approx

Fuel Consumption 12 oz min at full power, Fuel Jet A1

 

SimJet 3000-S AES GE £2,000

Thrust at full power 30 Lbs / ??N

Weight Including Starter 1,425g

Diameter 4.5 inches / 113mm

RPM Range 28,000 - 125,000

Exhaust temp 650 C approx

Fuel Consumption 13 oz min at full power, Fuel Jet A1

 

Nexus 3600 AES GE £2,230

Thrust at full power 36 Lbs / ??N

Weight Including Starter 1,700g

Diameter 4.5 inches / 113mm

RPM Range 30,000 - 118,000

Exhaust temp 680 C approx

Fuel Consumption 13 oz min at full power, Fuel Jet A1

 

About SimJet

SimJet is located in Aarhus Airport in Denmark.

We have been more than 17 years in the industry. We have in that time earned a reputation of being the most reliable micro turbine designer and manufacturer in the industry.

 

SimJet Test Bench

 

AMT Turbines all electric start

 

AMT Mercury HP EDT & ASU £2,340

Engine diameter. 100 mm 3.9 inches
Engine length. (Electric start engine) 292 mm 11.5 inches
Engine weight. (Electric start engine) 1550 g 3.4 Lbs
System airborne weight. (E-start system) 2235 g 5.1 Lbs
Engine, ECU, pump, battery, thermo sensor, straps.
Thrust @ S.T.P. 88N / 9Kg 19,8 Lbf
15 Deg. Celsius / 1013 Mbar. @ 151,200 @ 151,200
59 Deg. Fahrenheit / 29,91 in.
Maximum allowed r.p.m. 151,900
Thrust @ idle r.p.m. 4 N 0.9 Lbf
Idle r.p.m. 47,600
Pressure ratio @ max. r.p.m. 2.8 : 1
Mass flow. 250 g/sec 0.55 Lb/sec @88 N @19,8 Lbf
Normal Exhaust Gas Temperature. 650 C 1200 F
Maximum Exhaust Gas Temperature. 750 C 1380 F
Fuel Consumption 290 g/min 10 oz/min
@ max. r.p.m. and S.T.P. @88 N @19,8 Lbf

 

AMT Pegasus HP EDT & ASU £2,955 electric start

Engine diameter: 120 mm 4.7 inches
Engine length: (Electric start engine) 342 mm 13.4 inches
Engine weight: (Electric start engine) 2255 g 4.9 Lbs
System airborne weight: (E-start system) 3075 g 6.75 Lbs
Engine, ECU, pump, battery, thermo sensor, straps.
Thrust @ S.T.P.* (*see below) 167N / 17,0KG 37,5 Lbf
15 Deg. Celsius / 1013 Mbar. @119,500 ** @ 119,500 **
59 Deg. Fahrenheit / 29,91 in.
Maximum allowed r.p.m: 120,000
Thrust @ idle r.p.m: 6 N 1.3 Lbf
Idle r.p.m: 37,000
Pressure ratio @ max. r.p.m: 3.2 : 1
Mass flow: 375 g/sec 0.85 Lb/sec @157 N @35,3 Lbf
Normal Exhaust Gas Temperature: 600 C 1110 F
Maximum Exhaust Gas Temperature: 675 C 1250 F
Fuel Consumption @ max. r.p.m. and S.T.P.* 450 g/min 15.7 oz/min
(*see below) @157 N @35,3 Lbf

Fuel types: Kerosene - Paraffin - Jet A1 - White Spirit

* S.T.P. Standard Temp. & Pressure
Temp: 15 Degrees Celsius / 59 Degrees Fahrenheit
Pressure: 1013 Mbar / 29.91 in

 

AMT Olympus HP EDT, ASU  & GC £4,055 electric start

Engine diameter. 130 mm 5.1 inches
Engine length. (Electric start engine)374 mm 14.7 inches 
Engine weight. (Electric start engine)2850 g 6.3 Lbs
System airborne weight. (E-start system) 3795 g 8.35 Lbs
Engine, ECU, pump, battery, thermo sensor, straps.  
Thrust @ S.T.P.* (*see below) 230N / 23.5KG 51.7 Lbf
15 Deg. Celsius / 1013  Mbar. @108,500 @108,500
59 Deg. Fahrenheit / 29,91 in.  
Maximum allowed r.p.m. 112,000 
Thrust @ idle r.p.m. 8 N 1.8 Lbf
Idle r.p.m. 36,000 
Pressure ratio @ max. r.p.m. 3.8 : 1 
Mass flow. 450 g/sec 0.99 Lb/sec
 @230 N @51.7 Lbf
Normal Exhaust Gas Temperature. 700 C 1290 F
Maximum Exhaust Gas Temperature. 750 C1380 F
Fuel Consumption  640 g/min 22.5 oz/min
@ max. r.p.m. and S.T.P. * (*see below)@230 N @51.7 Lbf

Fuel types. Kerosene - Paraffin - Jet A1 -  White Spirit 

 

Heward Microjets

Heward Microjets Limited was founded by Phillip G. Heward the well known gas turbine designer since 1983. (He formerly founded Microjet Engineering Limited in 1995, and personally designed/ manufactured all engines sold by them). We are proud to present our exciting new range of gas turbine engines.

 

From the designer of such classics as the Phoenix MK4, the Panther HF15, the HF65/100/150...etc come four recently developed, brand new engines: the, Wasp 2 H20, the Cirrus H65, Nimbus H80 as well as the Altair H400 Turbofan.

 

Please keep an eye on the News and Current affairs page as this is being updated on a regular basis with details for all engines. as is the FAQ page, please do continue to email us with more of your requests and queries so we can build up a more helpful range of information.

 

Our Engines

The engines designed by us have many applications, both conventional and unorthodox: for land based-vehicles; aircraft ranging from models to UAVs and manned ultra lights and gliders; turbo shaft units for power generation, helicopters and turboprops. We are currently working on a series of small Turbofan engines in the thrust range of 150 - 400 lbf. As well as our standard range of engines, we can also build custom units for specific applications.

 

Wasp 2 H20 from £800

Max Thrust: 18-20 lb / 8.1-9.07 kg

Engine weight: 2 lb / 950 gr

Engine weight with starter: 2.4 lb / 1090 gr

Max RPM: 148,000 RPM

Fuel consumption @ max RPM: 260 ml/min / 200 gr/min

Diameter: 3.74 in / 95 mm

Length: 6.69 in / 175 mm

Length with starter: 9.64 in / 245 mm

Factory assembled engine, Sold with or without

ECU

 

Cirrus H65

This is the smaller brother of the H80. It has the same casing diameter but is slightly shorter and lighter.

 

The max thrust from the Cirrus is 65lb or up to 75lb for short durations. The idle thrust is 2.5lb.

The SFC is 1.23lb/hr/lb at 65lb thrust. And operates with the same autostat ECU and fuel pump as the H80.

 

Nimbus H80

Fully autostart ECU, Ideal power plant for UAV's and drones.

Specification

Max continuous thrust: 80 lb / 36 kg

Engine weight:11.35 lb / 5.15 kg

Weight with starter:12.67 lb / 5.67 kg

Max RPM: 90,000 RPM

Fuel consumption @ max continuous RPM:0.9 lt/min / 702 gr/min

Diameter: 6.14 in / 156 mm

Length: 15.07 in / 383 mm

Length with starter: 19.4 in / 492 mm

Wren Prices from Wren

Prices correct 2010

MW44 Gold Auto Start £1,700

Thrust at full power 10 Lbs / 45N

Weight Including Starter 600g

Diameter 3 inches / 75mm

RPM Range (no data)

Exhaust temp (no data)

Fuel Consumption 5.7 oz min at full power

Fuel Jet A1 or 1-K Kerosene

Lubrication 5% oil mixed in fuel

Maintenance Interval 50 Hours

 

Wren 70 Auto Start £1,650

Thrust at full power 14.5 Lbs / 66N

Weight Including Starter 990g

Diameter 3.5 inches / 89mm

RPM Range (no data)

Exhaust temp (no data)

Fuel Consumption 7.4 oz min at full power

Fuel Jet A1 or 1-K Kerosene

Lubrication 5% oil mixed in fuel

Maintenance Interval 50 Hours

 

SuperSport AutoStart £1,900

Thrust at full power 18.2 Lbs / 81N

Weight Including Starter 960g

Diameter 3.5 inches / 90mm

RPM Range (no data)

Exhaust temp (no data)

Fuel Consumption 9.7 oz min at full power

Fuel Jet A1 or 1-K Kerosene

Lubrication 5% oil mixed in fuel

Maintenance Interval 50 Hours

 

Wren 120 AutoStart £2,100

Wren 160

 

Wren 160 AutoStart £2,300

Wren 160

 

About Wren
Wren Turbines was formed in 1999 by Mike Murphy, John Wright, Roger Parish and Terry Lee. They had a shared interest in miniature turbines and had met through the Gas Turbine Builders Association.

The name was chosen because the Wren is commonly regarded as the smallest British bird and the company intended to specialise in the smallest engines.

The first Wren engine was the MW 54, designed by Mike with help from John. The designation comes from their initials (Murphy Wright) and the size of the compressor in millimetres. This was the first miniature engine to use a compressor size of less than 66mm, making it much smaller and lighter than all the previous engines.
It was available first as a set of plans and castings for homebuilders and then in January 2001 the MW 54 kit (Mk 1) was launched. This was followed by the Mk 2 (5.4 kg thrust) in January 2002, and the Mk 3 (6.4 kg thrust) in June 2004. The kits are very popular and are frequently bought by first-time jet fliers. The kit is fully balanced, easy to assemble, and there are over a thousand of the engines being flown all over the world. The MW54 is also available as a ready-built engine.

This was followed in 2002 by the Wren Turboprop, the first miniature two-stage engine. Like the MW 54 which is used as the first stage of this engine, it was available first as a homebuild plan, with detailed instructions for making the gearbox and a set of machined castings for the second stage. The following year the engine became available as a ready-built engine. It has undergone considerable development since and is now flown by some of the world’s top show fliers, including Thomas Gleisner (Airworld Raven) Quique Sommenzini (YAK 54) and Ali Maschinchy (Spitfire).

The development of the two-stage engine made it possible for people to build helicopters with Wren Helicopter engines. At first, gearboxes and conversion kits for helicopters were only available through third parties, and a number of customers designed and built their own gearboxes.
The Wren helicopter gearbox completed the engine in Autumn 2004 and made it possible for customers to buy everything needed for a turbine helicopter, directly from Wren.

The MW44, the smallest Wren engine, appeared in April 2003. This was another “first” for Wren, an engine with a 44mm compressor, about the size of a coke can, yet with 3kg of thrust. At first it was only available with a hand starter and then later with onboard start. There was much interest in an Autostart version but it proved very difficult to get this tiny engine to autostart reliably. In the summer of 2005 the MW44 was temporarily withdrawn from the market and more development work was done, resulting in the new MW44 Gold, an engine with Autostart, faster response and over 4kg thrust.

Wren’s most recent engine is the SuperSport, launched in March 2005. This is a development of the MW54 and is the same size but produces 8kg of thrust. It uses a new cast diffuser system and other innovations from the Wren team, giving it an exceptional power-to-weight ratio.

Wren is a company dedicated to the design and manufacture of miniature jet engines – we don’t do anything else. We employ 8 people in our factory at Manvers, Rotherham, UK. All the design and tooling for the turbine castings is done in-house and the turbine wheels are cast in specialist foundries to full aerospace certification. We are proud of the quality of our engines and the service and support we give to our customers.

 

Wren Installations

 

Wren MV44

 

Wren MV44

 

Wren MV54 in a Baby Boomerang

 

Testing Wren Turbines

 

Wren Turbine Kit (click on picture)

 

Hawk Turbines

 

How a model jet turbine works

A model jet engine design can vary from one manufacturer to another, but they all work on the same principle. The most common type nowadays is the centrifugal flow turbine, as opposed to the lengthier axial flow turbine.
A centrifugal turbine mostly differs in the stage of compression - air entering the turbine is thrown outwards as it passes over the spinning impeller. The air hits against the inside of the can and so is compressed greatly, before passing into the combustion chamber. This intense compression increases the temperature of the air, as well as the pressure.

The fuel, which is nearly always kerosene ('Jet A1'), is introduced into the combustion chamber as a very fine spray, and so mixes easily with the now very compressed air. This fuel/air mixture is then ignited by a small glow plug, much the same as the one found on a 2 or 4 cycle model airplane engine.

As the fuel/air mixture ignites and explodes within the chamber, it is forced rearwards towards the turbines. The turbines accelerate the velocity of the passing gases, and increase the pressure of them too. The gases (exhaust) finally get squeezed through the narrowing jet pipe at the very rear of the engine, exiting at great speed and pressure, thus generating the high levels of thrust.
The turbines are connected to the front impeller by way of a main shaft, so that they power the impeller as they spin.

 

The drawing below shows the basic principle of a centrifugal flow model jet engine.

Most model jet engines use an  electric motor to initially power-up the turbine. Only when the compressor has reached the necessary revolutions per minute (RPM), can the fuel be introduced into the chamber and the engine can then operate normally.

 

Dual Axis Vector Nozzle £100

Dual Axis Vector Nozzle

This dual axis Vector nozzle is built from stainless steel and aluminium. Pivot bearings are made from high quality brass,

  • Connection diameter: 110mm
  • Length: 225mm
  • Weight: 229 Gramm

Available from Dream Works RC

 

Gas Turbine Builders Association

 

Gas Turbine Builders Association website.

 

This Code of Practice has been prepared by members of the Gas Turbine Builders Association and is submitted in good faith to promote the building and safe operation of small gas turbines. The content of the Code is drawn from the collective knowledge of those individuals who, in recent years, have amassed significant experience in the building and operating of gas turbines intended for model aircraft.

Whilst every effort has been made to avoid errors and omissions, the authors cannot be held responsible for any eventuality arising from the application of this code. The safe operation of any gas turbine must remain the sole responsibility of the operator.

The Code incorporates the views and has the approval of the R/C Power Technical Committee of the British Model Flying Association and is ratified by the Jet Modellers Association.

How a Jet Turbines Works

How a Jet Turbine Works

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


JetCat Prices from Mikes Models 2009

 

SE-Second Edition SX-Special eXtreme

JetCat P160 SX £3,364

This is the newest turbine to the JetCat line! This was introduced at Florida Jets 2008 in Lakeland Florida.  Currently no detail on performance.

 

 

JetCat P120 SX £2,640

 

 

JetCat P60 SE £2,055

Thrust at full power 13 Lbs / 62N

Weight Including Starter 1.75 Lbs

Diameter 3.25 inches / 83mm

RPM Range 50,000 - 175,000

Exhaust temp 680 C approx

Fuel Consumption 7 oz min at full power

Fuel Jet A1 or 1-K Kerosene

Lubrication 5% oil mixed in fuel

Maintenance Interval 50 Hours

 

 JetCat P70 D £1,907

Thrust at full power 17.5 Lbs / 71N

Weight Including Starter 2.6 Lbs

Diameter 3.7 inches / 94mm

RPM Range 35,000 - 123,000

Exhaust temp 650 C approx

Fuel Consumption 8 oz min at full power

Fuel Jet A1 or 1-K Kerosene

Lubrication 5% oil mixed in fuel

Maintenance Interval 50 Hours

 

JetCat P80 D £1,817

Thrust at full power 20 Lbs / 82N

Weight Including Starter 2.9 Lbs

Diameter 4.4 inches / 112mm

RPM Range 35,000 - 117,000

Exhaust temp 580 C approx

Fuel Consumption 9 oz min at full power

Fuel Jet A1 or 1-K Kerosene

Lubrication 5% oil mixed in fuel

Maintenance Interval 50 Hours

 

JetCat P180 D £3,861

Thrust at full power 45 Lbs / 200N

Weight Including Starter 5.0 Lbs

Diameter 4.72 inches / 121mm

RPM Range 33,000 - 110,000

Exhaust temp 670 C approx

Fuel Consumption 24 oz min at full power

Fuel Jet A1 or 1-K Kerosene

Lubrication 5% oil mixed in fuel

Maintenance Interval 50 Hours

 

JetCat P200 D £4,273

Thrust at full power 45 Lbs / 220N

Weight Including Starter 5 Lbs

Diameter 5.12 inches / 130mm

RPM Range 33,000 - 113,000

Exhaust temp 670 C approx

Fuel Consumption 24 oz min at full power

Fuel Jet A1 or 1-K Kerosene

Lubrication 5% oil mixed in fuel

Maintenance Interval 50 Hours

 

JetCat Installations

 

JetCat P120

 

JetCat P80

 

JetCat Titan

 

JetCat P60

 

JetCat Turbine Videos

JetCat PHT3 Helicopter Turbine Start

 

JetCat P60 Start

JetCat P80 Start

 

New Turkey Feather Design

 

Afterburner Effect

A very realistic afterburner from Flugmodellbau.biz

a very powerful effect: The afterburner ring, designed to work with Multi light mini or Multi light Pro 3 gives you the optical effect of an afterburner at your jet model.  A basic current is applied plus an additional intermitting current showing the effect of a burning flame. Very impressive from some hundred yards of distance. The ring may be switched from the RC via separate switch or you may use it parallel to your gas-channel (V-cable). The switching point could be programmed at the electronic board.

F16 with Afterburner Effect 

Pilot Tor Christiansen

 

Jet Man using four JetCat Turbines

Pilot: Yves Rossy was born on August 27th 1957 in Neuchatel in Switzerland, as a professional military pilot flying Mirage III for 8 years, Yves then left and now fly's Boeing 747 for a living.

Jet Man as become Fusion Man

 

JetCat's new Marine Turbine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Stephen Peek | Peek Helicopters | Peek Fireworks | Peek House
Model Jet Club 2008-2010                                                                                                                                    

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